Tag Archives: Homeopathy

Homeopathy

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Article reads: Homeopathy isn’t new. It was named in 1796 by Samuel Hahnemann, a German physician, but has been practiced for hundreds of years in civilizations throughout the world. Treatment is based on the idea that a substance that produces symptoms of an illness in healthy people can be used to cure people who are suffering from that condition. This is referred to as “like cures like.”

Power of empathy

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Article reads: Even if the positive effects of homoeopathy are a result of the therapist’s empathy and time, this shouldn’t be dismissed. Such soft skills can have hard outcomes.

Homeopathic treatment used to treat histiocytosis

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http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_18315997?nclick_check=1

Article reads: Valerie Goodale of Novato believes that homeopathic treatments administered by a San Anselmo doctor cured her son of a rare, potentially life-threatening disease.

A look at homeopathy

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Article reads: While homeopathy regards these symptoms as important clues to imbalances in the body that cause disease, it understands illness as multidimensional and complex, unique to the individual, and most likely more mental and emotional than physical in origin.

Homeopathy controversy rages

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Article reads: Homeopathy critics, however, derisively call the product “oh-silly-no-see-um,” a reference to the absence of active ingredients. It’s products such as Oscillococcinum that have placed homeopathy in an awkward position: popular among holistic-minded consumers but scorned by scientists and most Western-trained doctors.

Homeopathy endures within controversy

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http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20110222/HEALTH/102220313

Article reads: The practice of homeopathy in this country has been and remains controversial, largely because the purported mechanism of homeopathic medicines is difficult to understand from a Western scientific perspective. Indeed, it is frequently ridiculed or belittled by conventionally trained medical professionals.

Swiss recognise alternative medicine

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Article reads: The government of Switzerland has bowed to popular pressure and decreed that state-backed health insurance must pay for five types of “complementary medicine” between now and 2017, pending an independent investigation of whether or not they work. Supporters of evidence-based medicine fear the process will confer credibility on dubious treatments.

Biopuncture

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Article reads: Akin to acupuncture and homeopathy, biopuncture involves a series of injections just below the skin at various trigger points on the body. The practitioner injects “micro doses” of natural substances meant to stimulate the body’s healing process.

Holy Grail: chemical receptors and all related to vitality

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Article reads: … one can actually propose that the time-honored mantra Better Living through Chemistry must extend to future efforts in chiropractic research in order for the profession to remain viable and conversant with medical research as well.  Come to think of it, the receptor itself as a vessel for specifically binding to classes of biochemical intermediates could be considered to be an updated, 21st century physiological Holy Grail.

Another reaction to the Homeopathy study

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Article reads: After 12 weeks, the 56 participants who remained in the study (the rest dropped out for a variety of reasons) used standardized assessments to self-evaluate their arthritis symptoms, including pain, inflammation, swollen joints and mood swings. Those who participated in the consultations — whether they received homeopathic medicines or a placebo — reported a significant improvement in their symptoms.

The placebo effect is sometimes considered a non-response, but in reality most placebo effects come with positive results. Hence, the placebo connects as well with a mind-body connection that western medicine can`t calibrate. Efficient ways to deliver placebo effects would be beneficial, to the horror of skeptics.